Social Media: Spotlight on the Speed of Change

Social Media: Spotlight on the Speed of Change

Social Media: Spotlight on the Speed of Change

People have complained about information overload since, well, since there were people. And I suspect that before homo sapiens, cro magnon man (and woman!) were also complaining about too much change.  Now that social media is here, change is happening faster than ever.

Insta-Updates

Insta-Updates

Insta-Updates

With the advent of social media, we can find out about our relatives’ health, life changes, and new pets instantaneously. And even if we don’t want to know, we hear about political opinions. By the way, here’s a fun piece about the latest election: Albert Einstein and the Menace of the November Election. Even on Instagram, which is the best place for introverts, in my opinion, people are yelling–YELLING!–about politics lately. Ugh.

Eustress

Eustress

Eustress

Change produces stress, and there are some types of stress that are in the Good Camp. Promotions at work, getting a seven-letter Bingo in Scrabble, or learning that you won the Lottery could be in this category.  As Elizabeth Scott outlines in When Stress is Good for You,  you don’t need to worry about all kinds of stress. Acute stress is particularly harmful. We humans like some things to remain stable, and not to have shifting sands under our feet.

Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram--Oh, My!

Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram–Oh, My!

Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram–Oh, My!

Just as all kinds of stress are not alike, not all social media platforms are created equal. Let me explain. Twitter moves fast and can catch you off-guard with its constantly moving articles, memes, and newsy tidbits. Facebook can be a rabbit hole of articles about cats who think they’re dogs (and dogs who think they’re cats!), and people ranting about every possible first-world problem.  The videos and sponsored posts can move quickly as well. If you want a more peaceful social media experience, Pinterest and Instagram are much quieter–without tons of ads or newsy posts screaming at you to pay attention.

Reframing Information Overload

There are a million rabbit holes and tasks that call out to us. There are parties and business events. And there is that little voice that says “you should…”. For myself, deciding what I could do versus what I should do makes all the difference. Did you know that there’s an Information Overload Awareness Day (October 18)? And an Information Overload Research Group?

silence photo

Meditation and Quiet Time

Everyone needs some time to completely withdraw from the world, whether that’s through meditation, yoga, or simply quiet time in the car. For all you introverts out there, here’s Six Facts About Introverts and Social Media That Will Impress Your Friends.

silence photo

How Do You Manage the Speed of Change?

Do you withdraw from the world or does being involved and “on” 24/7 excite and exhilarate you? Leave me a comment! And thank you.

 

 

Comments

  1. Good points! I am totally an introvert and need down time. I also agree with your assessment that Instagram is more low key than the other social channels. I get overwhelmed with too much activity on social media sometimes. For example the FB group Pantsuit Nation filled up my notifications and feed all day and night on Monday and Tuesday. I couldn’t keep up and needed a break from it.

    Not all social channels are created equal! I am glad they are different.

    I am personally working on unplugging more so I can be in the moment and not distracted by what’s going on digitally.

    • Hi Justine,
      It might be harder for us for two reasons: being introverts and having to be plugged in for our jobs. Facebook has become such a rabbit hole (sometimes with real rabbits who think they’re cats!), especially during the election.

      I really enjoy the quiet of Instagram much more these days.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Carol

  2. I’m also an introvert by nature. Social media can indeed be overwhelming. I like to engage with it in measured doses. I’m probably happiest plugging away in solitude on a new blog post or white paper.

    Being able to withdraw completely from the word is very important to me. Every morning I meditate and do a little yoga. The process of emptying my mind helps to keep me stress free and allows me to approach each new day with clarity and purpose.

    • Hi Clement,

      Yes on the plugging away in solitude–same here. Silence is soothing (and hardly ever completely silent).

      Yoga and meditation are so helpful. I like classes, where we can meditate or do yoga as a group. More and more of the people I know are opting for yoga and meditation. It’s wonderful to see!

      Thank you, as always, for your thoughtful comments.

      Carol

  3. I do enjoy change. It’s fun to just look back over say the last twenty years and try to appreciate just how much change there has been in so many area of our lives. I can be nostalgic at times for when things were simpler, but I would not trade now for then. Even with the stresses that come as part of the bargain.

    • Hi Kyle,

      Yes, I agree with you. I think a lot of us have “nostalgia glasses” on when we look back at the past. If we really went back to “simpler times” I don’t think we’d be that happy.

      Thank you for stopping by. I appreciate it!

      Carol

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